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             14 OF EVERY 100 HOUSES HAS A RADON PROBLEM
The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
recommends every house be tested for radon

and retested on a regular schedule

 

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      Did you know that nearly every house in the country has some radon in it and 14 out of every 100 houses has dangerously high radon levels?

          Everyone is at risk of radiation exposure from radon and older adults and children are most susceptible to the adverse health effects which include some cancers such as lung cancer, stomach cancer and leukemia.  Radon is also believed to cause or aggravate asthma.

          If there are children in your home or if you are pregnant, or elderly; if you are a daycare provider sometimes care for grandchildren or other children in your home, you especially want to be sure the indoor environment is safe and healthy for the kids.

          The potential for serious disease increases with exposure over time.  The average American receives 55% of his or her exposure to radiation from radon in their own home!  We're exposed to radon everywhere and your own home is the only place where you can control how much radon you're exposed to.  

            The EPA is concerned with the potential number of residential and commercial buildings that still have dangerous radon levels simply because they have not been tested.   Lifespace Corporation  joins EPA in the initiative to encourage radon resistant new construction and more radon testing in all types of buildings where people spend their time. Many people spend significant hours in homes, apartments, schools and businesses and may be at risk from radon.

          Radon is a colorless, odorless, radioactive gas. Radon is a by-product of the decay of uranium and can travel for miles underground. All residential, commercial, institutional and school buildings have some radon. Since geology is dynamic and always changing, every home should have either a continuous-read in-home monitor or regular annual radon testing. 

          Radon may cause or aggravate asthma, allergies, leukemia, stomach cancer and liver cancer!   Radon definitely causes lung cancer, this is a well known and proven fact and only cigarette smoking causes more lung cancer deaths than radon! (the combination is especially deadly, so if there's a smoker in your house be extra sure to test and monitor radon levels).  

We're exposed to radiation from a variety of sources each day. Radon, sunlight, televisions, computer monitors and many other sources. Of these, radon in the home is the largest single source of radiation and the one most easily controlled.  It just makes good sense to test for radon.

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RADON RISK ASSESSMENT CHARTS

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Chart #1 - Radon Risk If You Smoke

Radon Level If 1,000 people who smoked were exposed to this level over a lifetime*... The risk of cancer from radon exposure compares to**... WHAT TO DO:
Stop smoking and...
20 pCi/L About 260 people could get lung cancer 250 times the risk of drowning Fix your home
10 pCi/L About 150 people could get lung cancer 200 times the risk of dying in a home fire Fix your home
8 pCi/L About 120 people could get lung cancer 30 times the risk of dying in a fall Fix your home
4 pCi/L About 62 people could get lung cancer 5 times the risk of dying in a car crash Fix your home
2 pCi/L About 32 people could get lung cancer 6 times the risk of dying from poison Consider fixing between 2 and 4 pCi/L
1.3 pCi/L About 20 people could get lung cancer (Average indoor radon level) (Reducing radon 
levels below 2 pCi/L is difficult.)
0.4 pCi/L About 3 people could get lung cancer (Average outdoor radon level)
Note: If you are a former smoker, your risk may be lower.
* Lifetime risk of lung cancer deaths from EPA Assessment of Risks from Radon in Homes (EPA 402-R-03-003).
** Comparison data calculated using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's 1999-2001 National Center for Injury Prevention and Control Reports.

 

Chart #2 - Radon Risk If You've Never Smoked

Radon Level If 1,000 people who never smoked were exposed to this level over a lifetime*... The risk of cancer from radon exposure compares to**... WHAT TO DO:
20 pCi/L About 36 people could get lung cancer 35 times the risk of drowning Fix your home
10 pCi/L About 18 people could get lung cancer 20 times the risk of dying in a home fire Fix your home
8 pCi/L About 15 people could get lung cancer 4 times the risk of dying in a fall Fix your home
4 pCi/L About 7 people could get lung cancer The risk of dying in a car crash Fix your home
2 pCi/L About 4 person could get lung cancer The risk of dying from poison Consider fixing between 2 and 4 pCi/L
1.3 pCi/L About 2 people could get lung cancer (Average indoor radon level) (Reducing radon levels below 
2 pCi/L is difficult.)
0.4 pCi/L   (Average outdoor radon level)
Note: If you are a former smoker, your risk may be higher.
* Lifetime risk of lung cancer deaths from EPA Assessment of Risks from Radon in Homes (EPA 402-R-03-003).
** Comparison data calculated using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's 1999-2001 National Center for Injury Prevention and Control Reports.

 

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